Diet–microbiota interactions as moderators of human metabolism

@article{Sonnenburg2016DietmicrobiotaIA,
  title={Diet–microbiota interactions as moderators of human metabolism},
  author={Justin Laine Sonnenburg and Fredrik B{\"a}ckhed},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2016},
  volume={535},
  pages={56-64}
}
It is widely accepted that obesity and associated metabolic diseases, including type 2 diabetes, are intimately linked to diet. However, the gut microbiota has also become a focus for research at the intersection of diet and metabolic health. Mechanisms that link the gut microbiota with obesity are coming to light through a powerful combination of translation-focused animal models and studies in humans. A body of knowledge is accumulating that points to the gut microbiota as a mediator of… 
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