Diel flight periodicity and the evolution of auditory defences in the Macrolepidoptera

@article{Fullard2001DielFP,
  title={Diel flight periodicity and the evolution of auditory defences in the Macrolepidoptera},
  author={James H. Fullard and N. Napoleone},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2001},
  volume={62},
  pages={349-368}
}
We measured the 24-h flight activity patterns of 84 species of Nearctic Lepidoptera representing 12 ultrasound-earless and seven ultrasound-eared families to examine the evolution of the diel flight periodicities (DFPs) and auditory defences of these insects. Most species tested showed mixed DFPs (flight during day and night hours) with few being exclusively nocturnal. With the exception of one geometrid moth and one arctiid moth, only the butterflies (Papilionoidea+Hesperioidea) were… 
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TLDR
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