Did medicated salt hasten the spread of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum?

Abstract

With acknowledged difficulties in achieving satisfactory compliance rates for the large-scale delivery of many antiporositic drugs, the use of medicated salt has often been seen as a useful way to improve the level o f treatment in target populations. Iodinated salt is said to have contributed to a decline in endemic goitre, and salt medicated with chloroquine and/or other antimalorials, or with diethylcarbomazine, has been widely used in public health programmes against malaria and filariosis respectively. In this article, however, David Payne suggests that chloroquinized salt programmes may have been a major factor in promoting chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum.

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@article{Payne1988DidMS, title={Did medicated salt hasten the spread of chloroquine resistance in Plasmodium falciparum?}, author={Dianna Payne}, journal={Parasitology today}, year={1988}, volume={4 4}, pages={112-5} }