Did dinosaurs invent flowers? Dinosaur—angiosperm coevolution revisited

@article{Barrett2001DidDI,
  title={Did dinosaurs invent flowers? Dinosaur—angiosperm coevolution revisited},
  author={Paul M. Barrett and K. J. Willis},
  journal={Biological Reviews},
  year={2001},
  volume={76}
}
Angiosperms first appeared in northern Gondwana during the Early Cretaceous, approximately 135 million years ago. Several authors have hypothesised that the origin of angiosperms, and the tempo and pattern of their subsequent radiation, was mediated by changes in the browsing behaviour of large herbivorous dinosaurs (sauropods and ornithischians). Moreover, the taxonomic and ecological radiation of angiosperms has been associated with the evolution of complex jaw mechanisms among ornithischian… Expand

Paper Mentions

PERSPECTIVE The angiosperm radiation revisited, an ecological explanation for Darwins abominable mystery
TLDR
It is proposed that angiosperms due to their higher growth rates profit more rapidly from increased nutrient supply than gymnosperms, whereas at the same time angios perms promote soil nutrient release by producing litter that is more easily decomposed, which may have resulted in a runaway process once angiosPerms had reached a certain abundance. Expand
The roles of herbivory and omnivory in early dinosaur evolution
TLDR
Consideration of diversity patterns and relative abundance suggests that the ability to eat plants might have been a major factor promoting sauropodomorph success, but that it was less important in the early evolution of Ornithischia. Expand
The angiosperm radiation revisited, an ecological explanation for Darwin’s ‘abominable mystery’
TLDR
It is proposed that angiosperms due to their higher growth rates profit more rapidly from increased nutrient supply than gymnosperms, whereas at the same time angios perms promote soil nutrient release by producing litter that is more easily decomposed, which may have resulted in a runaway process once angiosPerms had reached a certain abundance. Expand
Diversity patterns amongst herbivorous dinosaurs and plants during the Cretaceous: implications for hypotheses of dinosaur/angiosperm co‐evolution
TLDR
It is shown that, with one possible exception, diversity patterns for major groups of herbivorous dinosaurs are not positively correlated with angiosperm diversity, and at the level of major clades, there is no support for any diffuse co‐evolutionary relationship between herbivory dinosaurs and flowering plants. Expand
If Dung Beetles (Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) Arose in Association with Dinosaurs, Did They Also Suffer a Mass Co-Extinction at the K-Pg Boundary?
TLDR
Molecular evidence is presented to show that the origin of dung beetles occurred in the middle of the Cretaceous, likely in association with dinosaur dung, but more surprisingly the timing is consistent with the rise of the angiosperms. Expand
Form, function and environments of the early angiosperms: merging extant phylogeny and ecophysiology with fossils.
TLDR
This work synthesizes the current understanding of early angiosperm ecology, focusing on patterns of functional ecology, by merging recent molecular phylogenetic studies and functional studies on extant 'basal angiosperms' with the picture of earlyAngiosperm evolution drawn by the fossil record. Expand
Dynamics of dental evolution in ornithopod dinosaurs
TLDR
Ornithopods were key herbivorous dinosaurs in Mesozoic terrestrial ecosystems, with a variety of tooth morphologies, and here they are focused on their remarkable dietary adaptations, using tooth and jaw characters to examine changes in dental disparity and evolutionary rate. Expand
Resolution of deep angiosperm phylogeny using conserved nuclear genes and estimates of early divergence times
TLDR
The molecular clock estimates of Mesangiospermae diversification during the late to middle Jurassic correspond well to the origins of some insects, which may have been a factor facilitating early angiosperm radiation. Expand
Dinosaurs and the Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution
TLDR
It is concluded that dinosaurs did not experience a progressive decline at the end of the Cretaceous, nor was their evolution driven directly by the KTR, and major diversification shifts occurred largely in the first one-third of the group's history. Expand
Herbivorous dinosaur jaw disparity and its relationship to extrinsic evolutionary drivers
TLDR
It is found that morphological and biomechanical mandibular disparity are decoupled:Mandibular shape disparity follows taxonomic diversity, with a steady increase through the Mesozoic, while the reduction in biomechanicals disparity following this peak coincides with the J/K extinction, the associated loss of sauropod and stegosaur diversity, and the decline of cycadophytes. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 349 REFERENCES
Ninety-seven million years of angiosperm-insect association: paleobiological insights into the meaning of coevolution.
TLDR
The early occurrence during the mid-Cretaceous of diverse and extensive herbivory on woody angiosperms may be associated with the innovation of deciduousness, in which a broadleafed angiosperm provided an efficient, but disposable, photosynthetic organ that with-stood the increased cost of additional insect Herbivory. Expand
The earliest angiosperms: evidence from mitochondrial, plastid and nuclear genomes
TLDR
This study demonstrates that Amboreella, Nymphaeales and Illiciales-Trimeniaceae-Austrobaileya represent the first stage of angiosperm evolution, with Amborella being sister to all other angiosperms, and shows that Gnetales are related to the conifers and are not sister to the angios perms, thus refuting the Anthophyte Hypothesis. Expand
Dinosaur Success in the Triassic: A Noncompetitive Ecological Model
  • M. Benton
  • Biology
  • The Quarterly Review of Biology
  • 1983
TLDR
There is no evidence that either thecodontians or dinosaur demonstrated their superiority over mammal-like reptiles in massive competitive take-overs in the latest Triassic, and explanations of dinosaur success based on the competitive superiority of their thermoregulation or locomotory capability are unnecessary. Expand
Ecological aspects of the Cretaceous flowering plant radiation
TLDR
Morphology of leaves, seeds, and wood is consistent with the status of most Cretaceous angiosperms as herbs to small trees with early successional strategy, and analyses of sedimentary environments indicate that angios perms not only originated in unstable habitats but remained centered there through most of theCretaceous. Expand
The Evolutionary History of Sauropod Dinosaurs
TLDR
Forked chevrons, which have played such an important role in previous studies of sauropod phylogeny, are here considered to have evolved twice within the Sauropoda, which may reflect a correlation between chevron shape and the use of the tail as a weapon within these twosauropod families. Expand
The role of insects in Late Jurassic to Middle Cretaceous ecosystems
The relationships between insects and other organisms in the Late Jurasic to Middle Cretaceous ecosystems is documented in the f ossU record by generalized to highly hostspecific vasailar plant andExpand
Angiosperm diversification and Cretaceous floristic trends: a comparison of palynofloras and leaf macrofloras
TLDR
In the latest Cretaceous, macrofloras and palynofloras both indicate that "pteridophytes," conifers, and other "gymnosperms" are generally less diverse than angiosperms, whereas conifer diversity shows no marked temporal trend. Expand
Comparing palynological abundance and diversity; implications for biotic replacement during the Cretaceous angiosperm radiation
TLDR
Analysis of an updated and expanded database of North American palynological samples from Cretaceous sediments document a rapid increase in angiosperm diversity and abundance within individual fossil palynofloras (represent- ing local/subregional vegetation). Expand
Timing in the evolution of derived floral characters: upper cretaceous (turonian) taxa with tricolpate and tricolpate-derived pollen
TLDR
New data on floral structure from the Turonian of the Atlantic Coastal Plain reveal a surprising diversity of floral characters in taxa bearing tricolpate and tricolporate-derived pollen, which suggest that rather specific modes of insect pollination already existed at 90 Ma. Expand
Implications of an exceptional fossil flora for Late Cretaceous vegetation
THE rapid radiation of angiosperms during the Late Cretaceous has been thought to reflect their rise to vegetational dominance1–3. The number of species in a clade and its vegetational importance areExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...