Did dinosaurs have any relation with dung‐beetles? (The origin of coprophagy)

@article{Arillo2008DidDH,
  title={Did dinosaurs have any relation with dung‐beetles? (The origin of coprophagy)},
  author={Antonio Arillo and Vicente M Ortu{\~n}o},
  journal={Journal of Natural History},
  year={2008},
  volume={42},
  pages={1405 - 1408}
}
  • A. Arillo, V. Ortuño
  • Published 1 May 2008
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Journal of Natural History
It is widely accepted that Mesozoic ecosystems were basically similar to Cenozoic ecosystems and it has been proposed that the role of dung‐beetles in those ecosystems was identical to that of today, but the dung of dinosaurs were used as a source of food instead of the dung of mammals. While dinosaurs have been known since Triassic, Scarabeids are present in the fossil records probably since Lower Jurassic. But a very important metabolic feature of dinosaurs has not been taken into account… 
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