Did biological control cause extinction of the coconut moth, Levuana iridescens, in Fiji?

@article{Kuris2004DidBC,
  title={Did biological control cause extinction of the coconut moth, Levuana iridescens, in Fiji?},
  author={Armand M. Kuris},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2004},
  volume={5},
  pages={133-141}
}
  • A. Kuris
  • Published 2004
  • Biological Invasions
In 1925, J.D. Tothill and two colleagues set out to manage Levuana iridescens, the coconut moth of Fiji, using biological control. By 1930, they had succeeded so completely that this pest of the copra crop had been reduced to almost undetectable levels by the tachinid fly, Bessa remota, introduced from Malaya, and they had summarized their campaign in a thoroughly documented and well-illustrated monograph. The example of the coconut moth is presented in the modern literature as the first and… Expand

Figures from this paper

Historical Review of Control Programs for Levuana iridescens (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae) in Fiji and Examination of Possible Extinction of This Moth by Bessa remota (Diptera: Tachinidae)
TLDR
To verify the continued presence of L. iridescens and H. dolens in Fiji will require a comprehensive campaign employing visual searches of coconut palm fronds, the use of ground and aerial malaise traps, canopy fogging, and perhaps chemical analysis of unidentified lepidopteran pupal cocoons found on the thatch of coconut fronds for comparison with chemical profiles of known L.iridescens populations. Expand
Phylogenetic position of the ‘extinct’ Fijian coconut moth, Levuana iridescens (Lepidoptera: Zygaenidae)
TLDR
This work investigated the sister-group relationships and phylogenetic placement of this moth using NGS-obtained ancient DNA sequences from museum specimens of L. iridescens collected in the 1920s, and showed that Levuana is most closely related to the Australian genus Myrtartona. Expand
BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF ARTHROPODS OF CONSERVATION IMPORTANCE
The small South Atlantic island of St. Helena has a highly degraded but internationally significant terrestrial flora, now covering only 1% of its land area. The 2500 gumwood trees, CommidendrumExpand
Alien Insects and Insect Conservation
The vast numbers of alien arthropods across the world collectively impose major conservation concerns. Many insect invaders are presumed to be pests but, even for acknowledged pest species, debatesExpand
Impacts of invasive parasitoids on declining endemic Hawaiian leafroller moths (Omiodes: Crambidae) vary among sites and species
TLDR
The variation in these data appears to be associated with habitat level characteristics, which, in combination with species-specific features, may mediate the impacts of non-native parasitoids on Omiodes species. Expand
Studies on the ecology of European Peristenus spp. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and their potential for the biological control of Lygus spp. (Hemiptera: Miridae) in Canada
TLDR
Investigations were made on the distribution, seasonal abundance and synchronization of Lygus spp. Expand
Is the Collapse of Mud Shrimp (Upogebia pugettensis) Populations Along the Pacific Coast of North America Caused by Outbreaks of a Previously Unknown Bopyrid Isopod Parasite (Orthione griffenis)?
A dramatic increase in prevalence of the recently discovered bopyrid isopod parasite, Orthione griffenis, likely introduced in the 1980s from Asia to the Pacific coast of North America, coincidedExpand
Beyond Pandora’s Box: quantitatively evaluating non-target effects of parasitoids in classical biological control
TLDR
The potential for non-target effects among insect parasitoids, the most common group used for biological control of arthropods, is examined and three different techniques, quantitative food webs, life table analysis, and experimental populations, respectively, are highlighted to quantitatively assess or reassess non- target effects in different systems. Expand
Exotic biological control agents: A solution or contribution to arthropod invasions?
TLDR
International guidelines, national regulations and scientific methods being used for exotic natural enemies in biological control have changed to require appropriate specificity testing, risk assessment and regulatory oversight before exotic natural Enemies can be released. Expand
Benefits and risks of exotic biological control agents
TLDR
The benefits of biological control as well as the associated risks including to human and animal health, plant health and particularly the environment are reviewed, and the major challenges for assessing risks and for balancing benefits and risks are identified. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 28 REFERENCES
Environmental issues involved in biological control of rangeland grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) with exotic agents.
TLDR
Given that the value of the rangeland resource depends upon the largely unknown ecological processes that underlie its sustainable productivity, there are a number of management techniques that offer a greater probability of success with a markedly lower likelihood of ecological and economic disruption than does neoclassical biological control. Expand
Biological control: Disputing the indisputable.
TLDR
This work disputes the implication made in the recent TREE article by Jervis~ that, among other advantages, the safety of classical biological control is 'indisputable', and calls for much greater caution in selecting biocontrol agents, and more thorough post-release studies on efficacy and nontarget effects, thereby determining the true fate of biOControl releases. Expand
Biological control attempts by introductions against pest insects in the field in Canada.
TLDR
It is concluded that most failures were caused by inadequate procedures, rather than by any weaknesses inherent in the method, that those inadequacies can be avoided in the future, and therefore that biological control of pest insects has much unrealized potential for use in Canada. Expand
Infiltration of a Hawaiian Community by Introduced Biological Control Agents
TLDR
This study highlights the importance of considering the potential damage caused by an introduced control agent, in addition to that caused by the target alien species, when considering the community-wide effects of introduced biocontrol agents on Kauai Island, Hawaii. Expand
Biological control of insect pests.
TLDR
It is emphasized again that in pest control the authors are involved in the management of a coexistence with insects and I think it appropriate to end with the thoughts of W.J. Holland: when all cities shall have been long dead and crumbled into dust, and all life shall be on the very last verge of extinction on this globe, a tiny insect shall be seated, representing the sole survival of animal life on this earth--a melancholy 'bug'. Expand
Ecological Effects of an Insect Introduced for the Biological Control of Weeds
TLDR
The weevil Rhinocyllus conicus Froeh, introduced to control exotic thistles, has exhibited an increase in host range as well as continuing geographic expansion and significantly reduced the seed production of native thistle flowerheads. Expand
Risks of species introduced for biological control
TLDR
Cost-benefit analyses and risk assessments for biological control introductions would have the salubrious effect of forcing consideration of myriad factors that now often receive cursory attention and of broadening public understanding of the issues. Expand
The implications of accepting untestedhypotheses: a review of the effectsof purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria)in North America
TLDR
The history of purple loosestrife and its control in North America is traced and little scientific evidence is found consistent with the hypothesis that purple loosESTrife has deleterious effects. Expand
Insect Biological Control and Non-target Effects : a European Perspective
A 4-year research project on ‘Evaluating Environmental Risks of Biocontrol Introductions in Europe’ (ERBIC) is described, and early results are presented. The project focuses on arthropod biologicalExpand
NEW ASSOCIATIONS IN BIOLOGICAL CONTROL: THEORY AND PRACTICE
TLDR
The new association approach for selecting biological control agents has been reanalyzed and it is concluded that this approach is ecologically and statistically sound and should contribute to the future success of biological pest control worldwide. Expand
...
1
2
3
...