Did Jean-Martin Charcot Contribute to Stroke?

@article{Bogousslavsky2010DidJC,
  title={Did Jean-Martin Charcot Contribute to Stroke?},
  author={Julien Bogousslavsky and Maurizio Paciaroni},
  journal={European Neurology},
  year={2010},
  volume={64},
  pages={27 - 32}
}
Stroke was never identified as a significant, autonomous field of activity of the emerging school of neurology at La Salpêtrière, which developed after the appointment of Jean-Martin Charcot (1825–1893) during the last days of 1861. However, stroke was already present in Charcot’s first paper (1851), which dealt with a case of multiple organ cardiac embolism, including middle cerebral artery infarction, at a time when the studies of Rudolf Virchow on thromboembolism were unknown in France. A… 
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TLDR
An excellent historical review of the growing interest in stroke among neurologists sparked by the development of clinical-topographic correlation studies, which stated that stroke was never a field of critical interest in the Salpêtrière and Pitié Schools when Vulpian and Charcot were the leading figures.
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