Did Cooked Tubers Spur the Evolution of Big Brains?

@article{Pennisi1999DidCT,
  title={Did Cooked Tubers Spur the Evolution of Big Brains?},
  author={Elizabeth Pennisi},
  journal={Science},
  year={1999},
  volume={283},
  pages={2004 - 2005}
}
In work in press in Current Anthropology , anthropologists announce a controversial theory that tubers--and the ability to cook them--prompted the appearance early in human evolution of large brains, smaller teeth, modern limb proportions, and even male-female bonding. The work challenges the current dogma that meat-eating spurred the evolution of key human traits, and it implies that human ancestors had mastered fire much earlier than is generally believed. But the idea dovetails with another… 

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