Diclofenac poisoning as a cause of vulture population declines across the Indian subcontinent

@article{Green2004DiclofenacPA,
  title={Diclofenac poisoning as a cause of vulture population declines across the Indian subcontinent},
  author={Rhys. E. Green and Ian Newton and Susan Shultz and Andrew A. Cunningham and Martin Gilbert and Deborah J. Pain and Vibhu M. Prakash},
  journal={Journal of Applied Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={41},
  pages={793-800}
}
Summary 1 Rapid population declines of the vultures Gyps bengalensis, Gyps indicus and Gyps tenuirostris have recently been observed in India and Pakistan, continuing at least up to 2003. Surveys indicate annual rates of decline of 22–50% for G. bengalensis and G. indicus during 2000–03. Previous studies in Pakistan have shown that the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac causes renal failure and is lethal to G. bengalensis when it feeds on the carcass of a domestic animal that… 

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