Diasporic Longings? Cahokia, Common Field, and Nostalgic Orientations

@article{Buchanan2019DiasporicLC,
  title={Diasporic Longings? Cahokia, Common Field, and Nostalgic Orientations},
  author={Meghan E. Buchanan},
  journal={Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory},
  year={2019},
  volume={27},
  pages={72-89}
}
  • M. Buchanan
  • Published 1 March 2020
  • History
  • Journal of Archaeological Method and Theory
As Cahokia experienced its prolonged abandonment and violence spread throughout the Midwest and Southeast, thousands of people left the American Bottom region and either established new communities or integrated into others. Tracing where Cahokians went has been difficult to discern archaeologically, begging the questions: How do we distinguish between diasporic and other kinds of population movements? And what might a diasporic community born of thirteenth and fourteenth century violence look… Expand
3 Citations
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Creating and Abandoning “Homeland”: Cahokia as Place of Origin
“Diaspora” is typically used in reference to large-scale population dispersals across borders of modern nation-states. This concept has particular connotations with regard to political dynamics andExpand

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