Diarrhoeal events can trigger long-term Clostridium difficile colonization with recurrent blooms

@article{VanInsberghe2020DiarrhoealEC,
  title={Diarrhoeal events can trigger long-term Clostridium difficile colonization with recurrent blooms},
  author={David VanInsberghe and Joseph Elsherbini and Bernard J. Varian and Theofilos Poutahidis and Susan E. Erdman and Martin F. Polz},
  journal={Nature Microbiology},
  year={2020},
  volume={5},
  pages={642 - 650}
}
Although Clostridium difficile is widely considered an antibiotic- and hospital-associated pathogen, recent evidence indicates that this is an insufficient depiction of the risks and reservoirs. A common thread that links all major risk factors of infection is their association with gastrointestinal disturbances, but this relationship to C. difficile colonization has never been tested directly. Here, we show that disturbances caused by diarrhoeal events trigger susceptibility to C. difficile… 

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