Diamonds sampled by plumes from the core–mantle boundary

@article{Torsvik2010DiamondsSB,
  title={Diamonds sampled by plumes from the core–mantle boundary},
  author={T. Torsvik and K. Burke and B. Steinberger and S. Webb and L. Ashwal},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2010},
  volume={466},
  pages={352-355}
}
Diamonds are formed under high pressure more than 150 kilometres deep in the Earth’s mantle and are brought to the surface mainly by volcanic rocks called kimberlites. Several thousand kimberlites have been mapped on various scales, but it is the distribution of kimberlites in the very old cratons (stable areas of the continental lithosphere that are more than 2.5 billion years old and 300 kilometres thick or more) that have generated the most interest, because kimberlites from those areas are… Expand
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