Diagnostic Techniques in Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Leg

@article{Shadgan2008DiagnosticTI,
  title={Diagnostic Techniques in Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Leg},
  author={Babak Shadgan and Matthew Rg Menon and Peter J. O'brien and W. Darlene Reid},
  journal={Journal of Orthopaedic Trauma},
  year={2008},
  volume={22},
  pages={581-587}
}
Objectives: To review the efficacy of the current diagnostic methods of acute compartment syndrome (ACS) after leg fractures. Data Sources: A Medline (PubMed) search of the English literature extending from 1950 to May 2007 was performed using “compartment syndromes” as the main key word. Also a manual search of orthopaedic texts was performed. Study Selection and Extraction: The results were limited to articles involving human subjects. Of 2605 primary titles, 489 abstracts limited to… 
Diagnostic Modalities for Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Extremities: A Systematic Review.
TLDR
The most common as well as many new and modified diagnostic modalities, which can serve as inspiration for future investigations to develop more effective and efficient diagnostic techniques for ACS.
Foot compartment syndrome: a systematic review of the literature.
We systematically reviewed published evidence regarding foot compartment syndrome with regards to causes, methods of diagnosis, number of incisions used for fasciotomy, wound closure techniques,
Etiology, Diagnosis and Management of Acute Compartment Syndrome: A Simple Review
TLDR
The study aimed to summarize the updated evidence regards, Etiology, Diagnosis and Management of Acute compartment syndrome, to prevent any surgical complications.
Acute Compartment Syndrome of the Limbs: Current Concepts and Management
TLDR
This clinical review discusses current knowledge on the relevant clinical anatomy, aetiology, pathophysiology, risk factors, clinical features, diagnostic procedures and management of an acute presentation of compartment syndrome.
Acute Compartment Syndrome: A Literature Review and Updates
TLDR
A review of the literature was done with the aim of determining the progress that has been made regarding the diagnosis and treatment of acute compartment syndrome, and concluded that early fasciotomy remains the only effective management of increased compartment pressures in ACS.
Compartment syndrome and regional anaesthesia: Critical review.
TLDR
The aim of this critical review was to answer the question, whether regional anaesthesia can delay the diagnosis of acute compartment syndrome and to discuss these high risk patients in considering RA as a method of choice for effective analgesia.
Acute traumatic compartment syndrome: a systematic review of results of fasciotomy
TLDR
The consensus was that diagnosis of compartment syndrome remains primarily based on a high index of suspicion and interpretation of clinical signs and symptoms over high technology methods of diagnosis.
Risk factors for acute compartment syndrome of the leg associated with tibial diaphyseal fractures in adults
TLDR
It is found that younger patients are definitely at a significantly higher risk of ACS following acute tibial diaphyseal fractures, as well as male gender, open fracture and IM nailing were not risk factors for ACS of the leg associated with tibiawning fractures in adults.
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References

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    Journal of orthopaedic trauma
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TLDR
It is suggested that the clinical features of compartment syndrome of the lower leg are more useful by their absence in excluding the diagnosis than they are when present in confirming the diagnosis.
Tibial plateau fracture with compartment syndrome: a complication of higher incidence in Taiwan.
TLDR
The incidence of compartment syndrome after tibial plateau fracture is more common than what has been reported in the literature, especially after high-energy trauma.
Acute Compartment Syndrome in the Absence of Fracture
TLDR
It is demonstrated that muscle necrosis is more commonly found in acute compartment syndrome in the absence of a fracture than in those with a fracture, and referral of swollen limbs without fracture for an orthopaedic opinion should not be delayed.
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TLDR
Acute compartment syndrome is seen more commonly in younger patients, under 35 years of age and therefore leads to loss of function and long-term productivity in patients who would otherwise contribute to the country’s workforce for up to 40 years.
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TLDR
Measurement of tissue pressure and direct nerve stimulation to be helpful for resolving ambiguous or equivocal cases and the skeletal stabilization of fractures associated with compartmental syndromes may facilitate management of the limb after surgical decompression.
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TLDR
Continuous compartment pressure monitoring is not indicated in alert patients who are adequately observed in acute tibia fractures, and the complication rates and late sequelae in both groups were not significantly different.
Acute compartment syndrome. Who is at risk?
TLDR
It is found that young patients, especially men, were at risk of acute compartment syndrome after injury and when treating such injured patients, the diagnosis should be made early, utilising measurements of tissue pressure.
The medical-legal aspects of compartment syndrome.
TLDR
While malpractice claims involving compartment syndrome were uncommon, they resulted in a high rate and amount of indemnity payments, and early fasciotomy not only improves patient outcome but is also associated with decreased indemnity risk.
MR imaging of compartment syndrome of the lower leg: a case control study
TLDR
MR imaging can help make the diagnosis of a manifest compartment syndrome in clinically ambiguous cases and points out the affected compartments and allows the surgeon to selectively split the fascial spaces.
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