Diagnosis of intraventricular cysticercosis by magnetic resonance imaging: improved detection with three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled echo sequences.

@article{Robbani2004DiagnosisOI,
  title={Diagnosis of intraventricular cysticercosis by magnetic resonance imaging: improved detection with three-dimensional spoiled gradient recalled echo sequences.},
  author={Irfan Robbani and Sushil Razdan and Kamal Kishore Pandita},
  journal={Australasian radiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={48 2},
  pages={
          237-9
        }
}
Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is caused when the cysticercus larvae of Taenia solium infect the central nervous system. The larvae usually land in the parenchymal tissue, but quite rarely can lodge in the ventricles and cisterns of the brain. Unlike parenchymal NCC, it is not easy to demonstrate the cysticercus cysts within the cerebrospinal fluid spaces. Computed tomography and even conventional MR sequences can fail to detect such cysts. However, obtaining three-dimensional spoiled gradient… 

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