Diagnosis of Radiographically Occult Lumbar Spondylolysis in Young Athletes by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

@article{Kobayashi2013DiagnosisOR,
  title={Diagnosis of Radiographically Occult Lumbar Spondylolysis in Young Athletes by Magnetic Resonance Imaging},
  author={Atsushi Kobayashi and Tsutomu Kobayashi and Kazuo Kato and Hiroshi Higuchi and K. Takagishi},
  journal={The American Journal of Sports Medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={41},
  pages={169 - 176}
}
Background: The early stages of spondylolysis are extremely difficult to diagnose on plain radiography. Although several studies have examined changes in active spondylolysis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), no studies to date have determined the onset frequency of active spondylolysis detectable on MRI but occult on plain radiography. Moreover, the clinical features of active spondylolysis described in the literature do not facilitate the differentiation of this condition from other causes… 

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