Diagnosis and treatment of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

Abstract

Diagnostic sigmoidoscopy and barium enema examinations (n = 214) or colonoscopy (n = 52) were performed for acute lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The cause of bleeding was detected in 76% (203 of 266) of the primary examinations, and the cause remained unclear after subsequent examinations in 17% of the cases. Hemorrhoids were the cause of bleeding in 28% (56 of 203) of the cases, colonic diverticular disease in 19% (39 of 203), adenomatous polyps in 11% (23 of 203), and colorectal cancer in 10% (20 of 203). The sources of bleeding did not differ significantly by sex. An anorectal site of bleeding was most often detected in patients less than 50 years of age (p < 0.0001) and a left colonic site in those more than 70 years (p < 0.0001). Hemorrhoids significantly more often caused rectal bleeding among the youngest patients (p < 0.0001) and colonic diverticular disease among the oldest patients (p < 0.0001) and colonic diverticular disease among the oldest patients (p < 0.0001) than among the others. Of the 266 patients, 19% have been operated on for the bleeding lesion. The mortality related to lower GI bleeding was 4% (11 of 266). The mean age of the patients who died was higher than that of those who survived (p < 0.05).

Statistics

0100200300'00'02'04'06'08'10'12'14'16
Citations per Year

382 Citations

Semantic Scholar estimates that this publication has 382 citations based on the available data.

See our FAQ for additional information.

Cite this paper

@article{Mkel1993DiagnosisAT, title={Diagnosis and treatment of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding.}, author={Jyrki Tapani M{\"a}kel{\"a} and Heikki O Kiviniemi and Seppo T. Laitinen and Matti I. Kairaluoma}, journal={Scandinavian journal of gastroenterology}, year={1993}, volume={28 12}, pages={1062-6} }