Diagnosis and management of iliac vein thrombosis in pregnancy resulting from May–Thurner Syndrome

@article{DeStephano2014DiagnosisAM,
  title={Diagnosis and management of iliac vein thrombosis in pregnancy resulting from May–Thurner Syndrome},
  author={Christopher C. DeStephano and Erika F. Werner and Brian P. Holly and Mark L. Lessne},
  journal={Journal of Perinatology},
  year={2014},
  volume={34},
  pages={566-568}
}
One of the least recognized risks for the development of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is iliac vein compression or the May–Thurner Syndrome (MTS), in which most often, the right common iliac artery compresses the subjacent left common iliac vein. We present three patients with MTS complicated by massive left lower extremity DVT managed with percutaneous pharmacomechanical thrombectomy during pregnancy. Although often not considered in obstetrics, percutaneous therapies to resolve extensive… Expand
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