Diagnosis and initial management of cerebellar infarction

@article{Edlow2008DiagnosisAI,
  title={Diagnosis and initial management of cerebellar infarction},
  author={J.A. Edlow and David E Newman-Toker and Sean Isaac Savitz},
  journal={The Lancet Neurology},
  year={2008},
  volume={7},
  pages={951-964}
}
Cerebellar infarction is an important cause of stroke that often presents with common and non-specific symptoms such as dizziness, nausea and vomiting, unsteady gait, and headache. Accurate diagnosis frequently relies on careful attention to patients' coordination, gait, and eye movements--components of the neurological physical examination that are sometimes omitted or abridged if cerebellar stroke is not specifically being considered. The differential diagnosis is broad, and includes many… Expand
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