Diabetic patients have a decreased incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome

@article{Moss2000DiabeticPH,
  title={Diabetic patients have a decreased incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome},
  author={Marc Moss and David M. Guidot and Kenneth P. Steinberg and G F Duhon and Patsy D. Treece and Robert F Wolken and Leonard D. Hudson and Polly E. Parsons},
  journal={Critical Care Medicine},
  year={2000},
  volume={28},
  pages={2187-2192}
}
Objective Our ability to predict which critically ill patients will develop acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is imprecise. Based on the effects of diabetes mellitus on the inflammatory cascade, we hypothesized that a history of diabetes might alter the incidence of ARDS. Design A prospective multicenter study. Setting Intensive care units at four university medical centers. Patients One hundred thirteen consecutive patients with septic shock. Interventions None. Measurements and Main… 
Diabetes mellitus: a negative predictor for the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome from septic shock.
TLDR
The first prospective study that identifies a clinical disorder associated with a decreased incidence of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)— diabetes mellitus and the mechanisms of protection against ARDS in diabetic patients are identified.
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TLDR
This study verifies that the presence of diabetes does not impact 60-day mortality in those patients in whom ARDS develop and expands knowledge by demonstrating that the protective association occurs in patients with all types of diabetes.
Role of Diabetes in the Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome*
TLDR
Diabetes is associated with a lower rate of acute respiratory distress syndrome development, and this relationship remained after adjusting for clinical differences between diabetics and nondiabetics, such as obesity, acute hyperglycemia, and diabetes-associated medications.
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TLDR
In a large, global observational study of patients with AHRF, no association was found between diabetes mellitus and having AR DS, developing ARDS, or outcomes from ARDS.
Effect of Preadmission Metformin Use on Clinical Outcome of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome among Critically Ill Patients with Diabetes
TLDR
Pre-admission metformin use was not associated with reduced 30-day mortality among ARDS patients with DM in the authors' medical ICU.
Timing of the Onset of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Population-Based Study
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ARDS in the community most often develops either during hospitalization or in patients who recently had contact with a healthcare system, and these findings have important implications for potential preventive strategies.
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TLDR
Elevated serum lactate levels in the ED and a recently validated clinical prediction score were independently associated with the development of ARDS in severe sepsis, which varied across the continuum of care.
Clinical predictors of and mortality in acute respiratory distress syndrome: Potential role of red cell transfusion*
TLDR
Packed red blood cell transfusion was associated with an increased development of and increased mortality in ARDS and was described here the clinical predictors of ARDS risk and mortality including the role of red cell transfusions.
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