Diabetes management: hospital or home?: Traditional hospital care for children newly diagnosed with diabetes is being replaced with home management. but, as denise matthams discovered, the evidence supporting either approach is scarce

@article{Matthams2003DiabetesMH,
  title={Diabetes management: hospital or home?: Traditional hospital care for children newly diagnosed with diabetes is being replaced with home management. but, as denise matthams discovered, the evidence supporting either approach is scarce},
  author={Denise Matthams},
  journal={Nursing Children and Young People},
  year={2003},
  volume={15},
  pages={34-37}
}
Denise Matthams BSc(Hons), RGN, RSCN is a Paediatric Diabetes Specialist Nurse, Worthing and Southlands NHS Trust, West Sussex Type 1 diabetes is the most common endocrine disorder in children. The initial management of the diabetic child and his or her family differs considerably from one area to another, dictated by local frameworks of care. Traditionally, children would be kept in hospital so that their early needs would be provided for, but increasingly this management approach is being… Expand
6 Citations
Management of newly diagnosed diabetes: home or hospital?
TLDR
The evidence concerning hospital or home based treatment at diagnosis for children with type 1 diabetes is reviewed, the Cardiff approach to home management is briefly described, and the benefits and disadvantages of different approaches to initial management are discussed. Expand
Insulin initiation among adults and children with diabetes in the United Kingdom
TLDR
There are wide variations in practice among the multidisciplinary team and that there is little published regarding the commencement of people with type 2 diabetes on insulin, suggesting that custom and habit still play a large role in current practice. Expand
Insulin initiation among adults and children with diabetes in the United Kingdom
TLDR
There are wide variations in practice among the multidisciplinary team and that there is little published regarding the commencement of people with type 2 diabetes on insulin, suggesting that custom and habit still play a large role in current practice. Expand
LIVING WITH CHILDHOOD DIABETES – Family experiences and Long-Term effects
TLDR
Investigation of families’ experiences when a child is diagnosed as having type 1 diabetes, and at one and three years after diagnosis found childhood diabetes was found to be associated with lower levels of attained education and self-assessed health in comparison with the general population. Expand
Resilience in families living with a Type I diabetic child
Type I diabetes has the ability to promote change in the family. In truth, although the child with diabetes is the diagnosed patient, the whole family has diabetes. While the challenges that familiesExpand

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 13 REFERENCES
Your child has diabetes: hospital or home at diagnosis?
TLDR
A critical appraisal of the appropriateness of these two approaches to care for parents of children with newly diagnosed diabetes is provided, with possible benefits and disadvantages of both approaches discussed and subsequently scrutinized in the context of childhood diabetes. Expand
Extension of a paediatric diabetes home care service
TLDR
As a result of home care there has been a sustained reduction in bed-days for newly diagnosed patients and for re-admissions of existing patients and the cost savings of reduction in beds alone at £235 per day outweigh the cost of the PDSN post. Expand
A decade of diabetes: keeping children out of hospital.
TLDR
Children with newly diagnosed diabetes may be safely and effectively managed out of hospital according to the commitment of consultants specialising in diabetes working in close cooperation with general practitioners, specialist nurses in diabetes, and dietitians. Expand
Ambulatory Care for Children with Newly Diagnosed Diabetes
Type 1 or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) is one of the most common chronic childhood disorders, the incidence for children aged under 15 years in the British Isles almost doubling fromExpand
Diabetes specialist nursing: looking to the future, learning from the past.
TLDR
The author contends that many of the problems currently faced by DSNs can be identified in the initial reactive creation and development of the DSN role which, in some cases, was 20 years ago. Expand
Incidence of insulin dependent diabetes in children aged under 15 years in the British Isles during 1988.
TLDR
There seems to have been an increase in the incidence rate of insulin dependent diabetes in children under the age of 15 years during the 15 year time period, and this would be a matter of considerable public health concern. Expand
Chronic sorrow in parents of children with newly diagnosed diabetes: a review of the literature and discussion of the implications for nursing practice.
TLDR
A critical appraisal of the evidence concerning grief reactions in parents of children with diabetes is provided and the extent to which this supports the expectations of the time bound theorists, that parents normally reach an end stage of the grieving process, or those of the proponents of chronic sorrow, who anticipate lifelong, recurring sadness. Expand
Adolescents' perceptions of physicians, nurses, parents and friends: help or hindrance in compliance with diabetes self-care?
TLDR
Young diabetics whose friends offered silent support, or who viewed friends as irrelevant, were more likely to report good compliance, and physicians' actions described as routine/negligent, disciplined control by parents, and domination by friends were linked with poor compliance. Expand
A normal lifestyle: parental stress and coping in childhood diabetes.
TLDR
Imp implications for nursing practice are outlined and suggestions made about how parents may be assisted to cope with the demands of having a child with diabetes are made. Expand
Family responses to children with diabetes and their influence on self-care.
TLDR
Major family responses included reminiscing about the time of diagnosis, changing the diet, scheduling daily routines, coping with and managing the diabetes, and worrying about insulin reactions. Expand
...
1
2
...