• Corpus ID: 78656398

Diabetes and cancer - a dangerous liaison? : The reciprocal impact of diabetes and cancer on outcomes with a special focus on drug effects

@inproceedings{Zanders2015DiabetesAC,
  title={Diabetes and cancer - a dangerous liaison? : The reciprocal impact of diabetes and cancer on outcomes with a special focus on drug effects},
  author={Marjolein M. J. Zanders},
  year={2015}
}
Purpose: To evaluate the association between cumulative duration of metformin use after prostate cancer (PC) diagnosis and all-cause and PC-specific mortality among patients with diabetes. Patients and methods: We used a population-based retrospective cohort design. Data were obtained from several Ontario health care administrative databases. Within a cohort of men older than age 66 years with incident diabetes who subsequently developed PC, we examined the effect of duration of antidiabetic… 

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