Dexmedetomidine versus morphine infusion following laparoscopic bariatric surgery: effect on supplemental narcotic requirement during the first 24 h

@article{AbuHalaweh2015DexmedetomidineVM,
  title={Dexmedetomidine versus morphine infusion following laparoscopic bariatric surgery: effect on supplemental narcotic requirement during the first 24 h},
  author={S. Abu-Halaweh and F. Obeidat and A. Absalom and Abdelkareem S Aloweidi and M. A. Abeeleh and I. Qudaisat and F. Robinson and K. Mason},
  journal={Surgical Endoscopy},
  year={2015},
  volume={30},
  pages={3368-3374}
}
AbstractIntroduction The primary aim of this pilot study was to determine whether the dexmedetomidine infusion initiated immediately after laparoscopic bariatric surgery, offers an advantage over a morphine infusion with respect to rescue morphine and paracetamol requirements over the first 24 post-operative hours. MethodsSixty morbidly obese adult patients scheduled for laparoscopic bariatric surgery were randomly assigned to receive an infusion of either 0.3 mcg/kg/h dexmedetomidine (Group D… Expand
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