Developmental variables and dominance rank in adolescent male mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx)

@article{Setchell2002DevelopmentalVA,
  title={Developmental variables and dominance rank in adolescent male mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx)},
  author={Joanna M Setchell and Alan F. Dixson},
  journal={American Journal of Primatology},
  year={2002},
  volume={56}
}
Previous research on semifree‐ranging mandrills has shown that the degree of secondary sexual development differs among adult males. While some males are social, brightly colored, and have large testes and high levels of plasma testosterone, other males are peripheral or solitary, and lack fully developed secondary sexual features. In order to determine how these differences among males arise, and to investigate the influence of social factors, we examined the adolescent development of 13… Expand
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  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of physical anthropology
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This review shows how different reproductive priorities lead to very different life histories and divergent adaptations in males and females and demonstrates how broadening traditional perspectives on sexual selection beyond the ostentatious results of intense sexual selection on males leads to an understanding of more subtle and cryptic forms of competition and choice in both sexes. Expand
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