Developmental evolution of flowering plant pollen tube cell walls: callose synthase (CalS) gene expression patterns

@article{Abercrombie2011DevelopmentalEO,
  title={Developmental evolution of flowering plant pollen tube cell walls: callose synthase (CalS) gene expression patterns},
  author={Jason M. Abercrombie and Brian C. O’Meara and Andrew Moffatt and Joseph Hill Williams},
  journal={EvoDevo},
  year={2011},
  volume={2},
  pages={14 - 14}
}
BackgroundA number of innovations underlie the origin of rapid reproductive cycles in angiosperms. A critical early step involved the modification of an ancestrally short and slow-growing pollen tube for faster and longer distance transport of sperm to egg. Associated with this shift are the predominantly callose (1,3-β-glucan) walls and septae (callose plugs) of angiosperm pollen tubes. Callose synthesis is mediated by callose synthase (CalS). Of 12 CalS gene family members in Arabidopsis… 
POLLEN TUBE GROWTH RATES AND THE DIVERSIFICATION OF FLOWERING PLANT REPRODUCTIVE CYCLES
TLDR
Angiosperm pollen tube walls consist largely of callose and contain far less material than do tube walls of other seed plants, which have little or no callose but high cellulose and pectin content.
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Callose and cellulose synthase gene expression analysis from the tight cluster to the full bloom stage and during early fruit development in Malus × domestica
TLDR
This work investigates the expression of callose and cellulose synthase genes during flowering from tight cluster to anthesis and during early fruit development in domesticated apple and links the changes observed in gene expression to the profile of soluble non-structural carbohydrates at different developmental stages of flowers/fruitlets and to the qualitative results linked to wall polysaccharides’ composition obtained through near-infrared spectroscopy.
Pollen tube development in two species of Trithuria (Hydatellaceae) with contrasting breeding systems
TLDR
New data for Hydatellaceae reinforce the idea that an acceleration of pollen tube development occurred in the Nymphaeales stem lineage, before the origin of Trithuria, suggesting traits underlying the lability of flowering plant post-pollination biology were present early in their history.
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