Developmental Neuroethology: Changes in Escape and Defensive Behavior During Growth of the Lobster

@article{Lang1977DevelopmentalNC,
  title={Developmental Neuroethology: Changes in Escape and Defensive Behavior During Growth of the Lobster},
  author={Fred Lang and C. K. Govind and Walter J. Costello and Sharon I. Greene},
  journal={Science},
  year={1977},
  volume={197},
  pages={682 - 685}
}
The changes in relative efficacy of two incompatible behaviors was investigated during growth of the lobster, Homarus americanus. In larval and early juvenile stages, physiological and morphological factors favor use of the escape response over defensive behavior. In large animals, defensive behavior is preferred almost exclusively to escape behavior unless the claws are lost. The interaction of escape and defensive behavior is modified by neural and morphological factors, which are dependent… Expand
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