Development of violence in mice through repeated victory along with changes in prefrontal cortex neurochemistry

@article{Caramaschi2008DevelopmentOV,
  title={Development of violence in mice through repeated victory along with changes in prefrontal cortex neurochemistry},
  author={D. Caramaschi and S. Boer and H. Vries and J. Koolhaas},
  journal={Behavioural Brain Research},
  year={2008},
  volume={189},
  pages={263-272}
}
Recent reviews on the validity of rodent aggression models for human violence have addressed the dimension of pathological, maladaptive, violent forms of aggression in male rodent aggressive behaviour. Among the neurobiological mechanisms proposed for the regulation of aggressive behaviour in its normal and pathological forms, serotonin plays a major role. However, the results on the detailed mechanism are still confusing and controversial, mainly because of difficulties in extrapolating from… Expand
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