Development of the declarative memory system in the human brain

@article{Ofen2007DevelopmentOT,
  title={Development of the declarative memory system in the human brain},
  author={Noa Ofen and Yun-Ching Kao and Peter Sokol-Hessner and Heesoo Kim and Susan L. Whitfield-Gabrieli and John D. E. Gabrieli},
  journal={Nature Neuroscience},
  year={2007},
  volume={10},
  pages={1198-1205}
}
Brain regions that are involved in memory formation, particularly medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures and lateral prefrontal cortex (PFC), have been identified in adults, but not in children. We investigated the development of brain regions involved in memory formation in 49 children and adults (ages 8–24), who studied scenes during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Recognition memory for vividly recollected scenes improved with age. There was greater activation for subsequently… 

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