Development of the Vestigial Tooth Primordia as Part of Mouse Odontogenesis

@article{Peterkova2002DevelopmentOT,
  title={Development of the Vestigial Tooth Primordia as Part of Mouse Odontogenesis},
  author={Renata Peterkova and Miroslav Peterka and Laurent Viriot and Herv{\'e} Lesot},
  journal={Connective Tissue Research},
  year={2002},
  volume={43},
  pages={120 - 128}
}
The mouse functional dentition comprises one incisor separated from three molars by a toothless diastema in each dental quadrant. Between the incisor and molars, the embryonic tooth pattern also includes vestigial dental primordia, which undergo regression involving apoptosis in their epithelium. Apoptosis appears to play an important role in achieving the specific tooth pattern in the mouse. We documented similarities in the folding mechanism allowing the formation of the dental lamina in mice… Expand
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