Development of the Lateral Line System in the Shovelnose Sturgeon

@article{Gibbs2004DevelopmentOT,
  title={Development of the Lateral Line System in the Shovelnose Sturgeon},
  author={Melissa A. Gibbs and R. Glenn Northcutt},
  journal={Brain, Behavior and Evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={64},
  pages={70 - 84}
}
The lateral line systems of aquatic amphibians and all chondrichthyan and osteichthyan fish present a similar array of mechanoreceptors. However, electroreceptors, the second major component of the lateral line system, have clearly undergone more significant evolutionary change. Chondrichthyans and non-neopterygian fish possess primitive ampullary organ electroreceptors, whereas significantly different ‘new’ ampullary organs and tuberous electroreceptors are found in a few groups of teleosts… 
The Development and Evolution of Lateral Line Electroreceptors: Insights from Comparative Molecular Approaches
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TLDR
Gene expression analysis and genetic analysis support the hypothesis that electroreceptors evolved in the vertebrate ancestor via the diversification of lateral line hair cells through modification of the mechanosensory division.
[Development of the lateral line system in juvenile Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii)].
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The Siberian sturgeon (Acipenser baerii Brandt), a chondrostean, occupies an important position in the evolution of the electroreceptor and the development of the lateral line system during early ontogeny was examined by using light and scanning electron microscopes.
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TLDR
The epidermal lateral line system of the Siberian sturgeon, which consists of mechanoreceptive neuromasts, ampullae and the electroreceptive organ, is studied to present new information concerning the peripheral innervation of lateral line receptors in sturgeons.
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Recent data on the gross morphology and cytoarchitecture of the brain of the sturgeon Acipenser naccarii, during ontogenesis are summarized and the main changes in the development of the five main brain subdivisions have been compared to the onset of different types of behaviour that provide a rough index of sensory and motor maturation.
Electrosensory ampullary organs are derived from lateral line placodes in bony fishes.
Electroreception is an ancient subdivision of the lateral line sensory system, found in all major vertebrate groups (though lost in frogs, amniotes and most ray-finned fishes). Electroreception is
Ontogeny of Electroreceptors and Their Neural Circuitry
TLDR
It has been claimed that Ampullary organs in catfishes develop from lateral line placodes, whereas ampullary and tuberous organs in gymnotids are claimed to develop from general ectoderm, and experimental studies are needed to resolve these different interpretations.
Transcriptome profiles of sturgeon lateral line electroreceptor and mechanoreceptor during regeneration
TLDR
Genes with specific expression in the two lateral line sensory organs suggests their important roles in mechanoreceptor and electroreceptor formation and the molecular basis for specification of these two sensory organs in sturgeon is suggested.
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