Development of the Chondrocranium in Hagfishes, with Special Reference to the Early Evolution of Vertebrates

@inproceedings{Oisi2013DevelopmentOT,
  title={Development of the Chondrocranium in Hagfishes, with Special Reference to the Early Evolution of Vertebrates},
  author={Yasuhiro Oisi and Kinya G Ota and Satoko Fujimoto and Shigeru Kuratani},
  booktitle={Zoological science},
  year={2013}
}
Recent molecular phylogenetic analyses have shown that the modern jawless vertebrates, hagfishes and lampreys, are more closely related to each other than to the other vertebrates, constituting a monophyletic group, the cyclostomes. In terms of their developmental morphology as well, it is possible to identify an embryonic pattern in hagfish embryos that is common to cyclostomes but not shared by jawed vertebrate embryos. On the basis of this pan-cyclostome embryonic pattern, we describe the… Expand
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