Development of ecology in Japan, with special reference to the role of Kinji Imanishi

@article{It2006DevelopmentOE,
  title={Development of ecology in Japan, with special reference to the role of Kinji Imanishi},
  author={Yosiaki Itǒ},
  journal={Ecological Research},
  year={2006},
  volume={6},
  pages={139-155}
}
  • Yosiaki Itǒ
  • Published 1 August 1991
  • Environmental Science
  • Ecological Research
The development of ecology in Japan, especially after the Meiji Restoration (1868), is briefly reviewed. Pioneering studies of Hiratsuka, on the calorimetric budget of a silkworm population, and Motomura, on the relation between numbers of species and individuals in biotic communities, are noteworthy. A critical examination of his role in ecology in Japan reveals Kinji Imanishi to have played pivotal roles in leading Japanese population ecologists to realize the importance of dispersal in… 
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The neuroscience of primate intellectual evolution: natural selection and passive and intentional niche construction
  • A. Iriki, O. Sakura
  • Psychology, Biology
    Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  • 2008
TLDR
A theory of ‘intentional niche construction’ as an extension of natural selection is proposed in order to reveal the evolutionary mechanisms that forged the uniquely intelligent human brain.
Imanishi, Kinji (1902-1992)

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