Development of a human error taxonomy for software requirements: A systematic literature review

@article{Anu2018DevelopmentOA,
  title={Development of a human error taxonomy for software requirements: A systematic literature review},
  author={Vaibhav Anu and Wenhua Hu and Jeffrey C. Carver and Gursimran Singh Walia and Gary L. Bradshaw},
  journal={Inf. Softw. Technol.},
  year={2018},
  volume={103},
  pages={112-124}
}

Defect Prevention in Requirements Using Human Error Information: An Empirical Study

The results of this study show that a better understanding of human errors does lead developers to insert fewer problems into their own requirements documents, and indicate that different types of Human Error information have different impacts on fault prevention.

Using human error information for error prevention

Evaluating whether understanding human errors contributes to the prevention of errors and concomitant faults during requirements engineering and identifying error prevention techniques used in industrial practice showed that the better a requirements engineer understands human errors, the fewer errors and Concomitant Fault makes when developing a new requirements document.

Training Industry Practitioners to Investigate the Human Error Causes of Requirements Faults

An industrial study to evaluate whether human error training procedures and instrumentation created by authors can be used to train industry software practitioners on human errors that occur during requirements engineering process shows that parts of the training procedures need to be improved.

Developing and Evaluating Learning Materials to Introduce Human Error Concepts in Software Engineering Courses: Results from Industry and Academia

Whether requirements inspections supported by human errors can be used to deliver knowledge about software engineering human errors as well as knowledge about requirements inspections (a key industry skill) to students is evaluated.

The Effects of Human Aspects on the Requirements Engineering Process: A Systematic Literature Review

To identify if any critical human aspects have been found, and what might be the relationships between different human aspects impacting the RE process, a systematic literature review was conducted and 474 initial primary research studies were identified.

The Influence of Human Aspects on Requirements Engineering: Software Practitioners Perspective

The findings suggest that software practitioners’ personality characteristics should also be paid more attention to as they are important when conducting RE effectively.

Cognition in Software Engineering: A Taxonomy and Survey of a Half-Century of Research

A taxonomy of cognitive concepts and a survey of the literature since the beginning of the Software Engineering discipline are provided, which discusses the research gap in each cognitive concept and provides recommendations for future research.

A Human Error Based Approach to Understanding Programmer-Induced Software Vulnerabilities

A classification for the most frequently observed human errors committed by the programmers (the commitment of a human error can lead to injection of one or more security defects/bugs) can be useful for software development organizations as they can train developers on the human errors so that developers can avoid committing the human mistakes themselves, thereby reducing the chances of vulnerability injection in their code.

Role of Human Aspects on the process of Software Requirement Elicitation

: Requirement elicitation(RE) process requires collaboration with people of different backgrounds and expertise. Collaboration between diverse teams such as developers, testers, designers,

The Impact of Controlled Vocabularies on Requirements Engineering Activities: A Systematic Mapping Study

The evidence demonstrates the usefulness of the CVs in all RE activities, especially during elicitation and specification, helping developers understand, facilitating the automation process and identifying defects, conflicts and ambiguities in the requirements.

References

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Defect Prevention in Requirements Using Human Error Information: An Empirical Study

The results of this study show that a better understanding of human errors does lead developers to insert fewer problems into their own requirements documents, and indicate that different types of Human Error information have different impacts on fault prevention.

Detection of Requirement Errors and Faults via a Human Error Taxonomy: A Feasibility Study

The Human Error Taxonomy is effective for identifying and classifying requirements errors and faults, thereby helping to improve the overall quality of the SRS and the software.

Effectiveness of Human Error Taxonomy during Requirements Inspection: An Empirical Investigation

Results show that subjects using HET were not only more effective at detecting faults, but they found faults faster, and post-hoc analysis of HET revealed meaningful insights into the most commonly occurring human errors at different points during requirements development.

Using a Cognitive Psychology Perspective on Errors to Improve Requirements Quality: An Empirical Investigation

A newly developed Human Error Taxonomy (HET) and a formal Error-Abstraction and Inspection (EAI) process to improve fault detection performance of inspectors during the requirements inspection and provide useful insights into commonly occurring human errors that contributed to requirement faults are described.

Using error abstraction and classification to improve requirement quality: conclusions from a family of four empirical studies

Achieving high software quality is a primary concern for software development organizations. Researchers have developed many quality improvement methods that help developers detect faults early in

A Taxonomy System to Identify Human Error Causes for Software Defects

The results show that the taxonomy system of software developers (TSSD) appears to be a reliable and useful system for studying human error in CASI and has potential application value in defect causal analysis (DCA) for the generalized software industry.

Usefulness of a Human Error Identification Tool for Requirements Inspection: An Experience Report

This empirical study investigates the effectiveness of a newly developed Human Error Abstraction Assist (HEAA) tool in helping inspectors identify human errors to guide the fault detection during the requirements inspection.

Experimenting with error abstraction in requirements documents

  • F. LanubileF. ShullV. Basili
  • Computer Science
    Proceedings Fifth International Software Metrics Symposium. Metrics (Cat. No.98TB100262)
  • 1998
An empirical study is presented whose main purpose is to investigate whether defect detection in requirements documents can be improved by focusing on the errors in a document rather than the individual faults that they cause.