Development and Validity of a 2-Item Screen to Identify Families at Risk for Food Insecurity

@article{Hager2010DevelopmentAV,
  title={Development and Validity of a 2-Item Screen to Identify Families at Risk for Food Insecurity},
  author={Erin R. Hager and Anna M. Quigg and Maureen M. Black and Sharon Coleman and Timothy Heeren and Ruth Rose-Jacobs and John Cook and Stephanie Ettinger de Cuba and Patrick H. Casey and Mariana Chilton and Diana Becker Cutts and Alan F. Meyers and Deborah A. Frank},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2010},
  volume={126},
  pages={e26 - e32}
}
OBJECTIVES: To develop a brief screen to identify families at risk for food insecurity (FI) and to evaluate the sensitivity, specificity, and convergent validity of the screen. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Caregivers of children (age: birth through 3 years) from 7 urban medical centers completed the US Department of Agriculture 18-item Household Food Security Survey (HFSS), reports of child health, hospitalizations in their lifetime, and developmental risk. Children were weighed and measured. An FI… 

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