Development and Characterization of a Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome—Associated Coronavirus—Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody That Provides Effective Immunoprophylaxis in Mice

@article{Greenough2005DevelopmentAC,
  title={Development and Characterization of a Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome—Associated Coronavirus—Neutralizing Human Monoclonal Antibody That Provides Effective Immunoprophylaxis in Mice},
  author={Thomas C. Greenough and Gregory J Babcock and Anjeanette Roberts and Hector J. Hernandez and William D. Thomas and Jennifer A. Coccia and Robert F. Graziano and Mohan Srinivasan and Israel Lowy and Robert W. Finberg and Kanta Subbarao and Leatrice N Vogel and Mohan Somasundaran and Katherine Luzuriaga and John L. Sullivan and Donna M. Ambrosino},
  journal={The Journal of Infectious Diseases},
  year={2005},
  volume={191},
  pages={507 - 514}
}
Abstract Background. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) remains a significant public health concern after the epidemic in 2003. Human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that neutralize SARS-associated coronavirus (SARSCoV) could provide protection for exposed individuals. Methods. Transgenic mice with human immunoglobulin genes were immunized with the recombinant major surface (S) glycoprotein ectodomain of SARS-CoV. Epitopes of 2 neutralizing MAbs derived from these mice were mapped and… Expand
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