Developing novel chemical entities for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders: an academic perspective.

Abstract

Historically, most Federal Drug Administration-approved drugs were the result of "in-house" efforts within large pharmaceutical companies. Over the last two decades, this paradigm has steadily shifted as the drug industry turned to startups, small biotechnology companies, and academia for the identification of novel drug targets and early drug candidates. This strategic pivot has created new opportunities for groups less traditionally associated with the creation of novel therapeutics, including small academic laboratories, for engagement in the drug discovery process. A recent example of the successful development of a drug that had its origins in academia is eliglustat tartrate, an oral agent for Gaucher disease type 1.

DOI: 10.1152/ajprenal.00393.2015

Cite this paper

@article{Shayman2015DevelopingNC, title={Developing novel chemical entities for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders: an academic perspective.}, author={James Alan Shayman}, journal={American journal of physiology. Renal physiology}, year={2015}, volume={309 12}, pages={F996-9} }