Developing mental health mobile apps: Exploring adolescents’ perspectives

@article{Kenny2016DevelopingMH,
  title={Developing mental health mobile apps: Exploring adolescents’ perspectives},
  author={Rachel Kenny and Barbara Dooley and Amanda Fitzgerald},
  journal={Health Informatics Journal},
  year={2016},
  volume={22},
  pages={265 - 275}
}
Mobile applications or ‘apps’ have significant potential for use in mental health interventions with adolescents. However, there is a lack of research exploring end users’ needs from such technologies. The aim of this study was to explore adolescents’ needs and concerns in relation to mental health mobile apps. Five focus groups were conducted with young people aged 15–16 years (N = 34, 60% male). Participants were asked about their views in relation to the use of mental health mobile… Expand

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