Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare

@inproceedings{Davies2016DevelopingAC,
  title={Developing a Collaborative Agenda for Humanities and Social Scientific Research on Laboratory Animal Science and Welfare},
  author={Gail F. Davies and Beth J Greenhough and Pru Hobson-West and Robert G W Kirk and Ken Applebee and Laura C. Bellingan and Manuel Berdoy and Henry J Buller and Helen Joan Cassaday and Keith G Davies and Daniela Diefenbacher and Tone Druglitr\o and Maria Paula Escobar and Carrie Friese and Kathrin Herrmann and Amy Hinterberger and Wendy J. Jarrett and Kimberley Jayne and Adam M. Johnson and Elizabeth R. Johnson and Timm Konold and Matthew C Leach and Sabina Leonelli and David I Lewis and Elliot J. Lilley and Emma R. Longridge and Carmen M. McLeod and Mara Miele and Nicole C. Nelson and Elisabeth H. Ormandy and Helen Pallett and Lonneke Poort and Pandora Pound and Edmund Ramsden and Emma J. Roe and Helen Scalway and Astrid Schrader and Chris J Scotton and Cheryl L. Scudamore and Jane R Smith and Lucy E Whitfield and Sarah Wolfensohn},
  booktitle={PloS one},
  year={2016}
}
Improving laboratory animal science and welfare requires both new scientific research and insights from research in the humanities and social sciences. Whilst scientific research provides evidence to replace, reduce and refine procedures involving laboratory animals (the '3Rs'), work in the humanities and social sciences can help understand the social, economic and cultural processes that enhance or impede humane ways of knowing and working with laboratory animals. However, communication across… CONTINUE READING