Corpus ID: 14950373

Developing Science-Based Per Se Limits for Driving under the Influence of Cannabis (DUIC)

@inproceedings{Grotenhermen2005DevelopingSP,
  title={Developing Science-Based Per Se Limits for Driving under the Influence of Cannabis (DUIC)},
  author={Franjo Grotenhermen and Gero Leson and G{\"u}nter Berghaus and Olaf H. Drummer and Hans-Peter Kr{\"u}ger and Marie C Longo and Herbert Moskowitz and Bud Perrine and Johannes G Ramaekers and Alison M. Smiley and Rob Tunbridge},
  year={2005}
}
Summary of States with Per Se DUID Laws (Updated March 2005)State Zero-tolerancestandard, incl.metabolite in urineZero THC in blood Arizona Y YGeorgia Y YIllinois Y YIndiana Y YIowa N YMichigan N YMinnesota N Cannabis exemptOther CS bannedNevada 10–15 ng/mL in urine 2–5 ng/mL in bloodNorth Carolina N For minors onlyPennsylvania (Cannabis metabolitesnot prosecuted)5 ng/mL in bloodRhode Island N YUtah Y YVirginia N Cannabis exempt; specifiedlevels of other CSWisconsin N Y Per se laws fall into… Expand

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