Developer fluency: achieving true mastery in software projects

@inproceedings{Zhou2010DeveloperFA,
  title={Developer fluency: achieving true mastery in software projects},
  author={Minghui Zhou and Audris Mockus},
  booktitle={FSE '10},
  year={2010}
}
Outsourcing and offshoring lead to a rapid influx of new developers in software projects. That, in turn, manifests in lower productivity and project delays. To address this common problem we study how the developers become fluent in software projects. We found that developer productivity in terms of number of tasks per month increases with project tenure and plateaus within a few months in three small and medium projects and it takes up to 12 months in a large project. When adjusted for the… 

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