Detoxifying toxicants: interactions between sulfide and iron toxicity in freshwater wetlands.

@article{vanderWelle2006DetoxifyingTI,
  title={Detoxifying toxicants: interactions between sulfide and iron toxicity in freshwater wetlands.},
  author={Marlies E. W. van der Welle and Mieke L C Cuppens and Leon P. M. Lamers and Jan G. M. Roelofs},
  journal={Environmental toxicology and chemistry},
  year={2006},
  volume={25 6},
  pages={
          1592-7
        }
}
In many Dutch freshwater wetlands, concentrations of sulfate in the surface water and groundwater have increased. It is especially in peaty areas that this can lead to problems, including the reduction of sulfate to toxic sulfide. Our aquarium experiments showed that even low sulfide concentrations of 50 micromol/L are toxic to the freshwater macrophyte Nitella flexilis and the freshwater oligochaete Ophidonais serpentina. Sulfide toxicity can be modified by the availability of free iron in… Expand
Differential responses of the freshwater wetland species Juncus effusus L. and Caltha palustris L. to iron supply in sulfidic environments.
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TLDR
Results indicate that exposure of developing wild rice to sulfide at ≥3.1’mg sulfide/L in the presence of 0.8 mg Fe/L reduced mesocotyl emergence, demonstrating the importance of iron in mitigating sulfide toxicity to wild rice. Expand
Sulfur Development in the Water-Sediment System of the Algae Accumulation Embay Area in Lake Taihu
Sulfur development in water-sediment systems is closely related to eutrophication and harmful algae blooms (HABs). However, the development of sulfur in water-sediment systems during heavy algaeExpand
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