Determinants of Summiting Success and Acute Mountain Sickness on Mt Kilimanjaro (5895 m)

@inproceedings{Davies2009DeterminantsOS,
  title={Determinants of Summiting Success and Acute Mountain Sickness on Mt Kilimanjaro (5895 m)},
  author={Andrew J. Davies and Nicholas S Kalson and Suzy H M Stokes and Mark D. Earl and Adam G. Whitehead and Hannah Frost and Ian Tyrell-Marsh and Jon Naylor},
  booktitle={Wilderness \& environmental medicine},
  year={2009}
}
Abstract Objective.—To determine the incidence of acute mountain sickness (AMS), the frequency of summiting success, and the factors that affect these in trekkers on Kilimanjaro, one of the world's most summitted high-altitude peaks. Methods.—The study group comprised 312 trekkers attempting Mt Kilimanjaro summit by the Marango Route. Trekkers ascended over 4 or 5 days along a fixed ascent profile, stopping at 3 huts on ascent (2700 m, 3700 m, and 4700 m) before attempting the summit… 
Incidence and predictors of acute mountain sickness among trekkers on Mount Kilimanjaro.
TLDR
It is found that the rate of AMS on Mount Kilimanjaro is high and there was no evidence of a protective effect of acetazolamide or a single rest day at these fast ascent rates, and there is a need to increase public awareness of the risks of altitude sickness.
Oximetry fails to predict acute mountain sickness or summit success during a rapid ascent to 5640 meters.
Incidence of acute mountain sickness in UK Military Personnel on Mount Kenya
TLDR
The incidence of AMS during AT on Mount Kenya using this ascent profile is high, and adapting the current ascent profile, planning the ascent after time in country and reducing perceived exertion during the trek may reduce the incidence.
Different duration of high-altitude pre-exposure associated with the incidence of acute mountain sickness on Jade Mountain.
SPECTRUM OF PRESENTATION OF ACUTE MOUNTAIN SICKNESS AT DIFFERENT ALTITUDES
TLDR
The severity of signs and symptoms increased with altitude, and the most common symptoms were headache, insomnia, fatigue, dizziness and gastrointestinal symptoms including nausea and vomiting.
Risk and protective factors for acute mountain sickness: a meta-analysis
TLDR
This study suggests that younger age, non-smoking, history of AMS, nonacclimatization, and hiking to a high maximum altitude (>2500m) increases the possibility of suffering from AMS.
Twice-daily assessment of trekkers on Kilimanjaro's Machame route to evaluate the incidence and time-course of acute mountain sickness.
  • Joel Meyer
  • Environmental Science
    High altitude medicine & biology
  • 2012
TLDR
Twice-daily measurements of AMS symptoms provide detailed insight into the time-course and evolution ofAMS during ascent on Kilimanjaro, and suggest the 6-day Machame route may delay the onset but does not ultimately protect against AMS.
Acute mountain sickness in travelers who consulted a pre-travel clinic.
TLDR
No preventive effect of a low dose of acetazolamide was found in this retrospective observational study on the incidence and predictors of acute mountain sickness in travelers who consulted a pre-travel clinic and the compliance with advices concerning this condition.
Controlled hyperventilation after training may accelerate altitude acclimatization.
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References

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TLDR
An educational program is recommended for all the trekking agencies that guide on this peak and, in particular, the Tanzania-based guiding agencies, which, typically, are driving these very fast ascent rates.
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TLDR
The incidence of acute mountain sickness is high in Iranian trekkers ascending Mount Damavand and some of the contributing factors are preventable, so an educational program for trekkers to high altitudes in Iran is suggested.
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TLDR
High-altitude pilgrims, especially women pilgrims in this study, seem to be a very susceptible group and Preventive measures in these pilgrims need to be adopted to avoid AMS, specifically life-threatening HACE and HAPE.
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TLDR
The Lake Louise consensus score is adequate and, compared with the AMS-C score, more effective for the assessment of acute altitude illness at different altitudes.
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TLDR
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BACKGROUND Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a usually self-limiting syndrome encompassing headache, nausea and dizziness. AMS is seen in those that go from low to high altitudes too quickly, without
Climbers with diabetes do well on Mount Kilimanjaro
TLDR
The physiological response to high altitude in the diabetic group was not different to that in nondiabetic climbers, and it is suggested the two extra acclimatization nights and the high rate of acetazolamide use were critical factors in this group’s success.
Prediction of the susceptibility to AMS in simulated altitude
TLDR
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TLDR
The effectiveness of pharmacologic prophylaxis against AMS with acetazolamide or dexamethasone appears to be more effective, but inconsistencies in dexamETHasone dosing, environmental conditions, and rate of ascent confound interpretation are pointed out.
Efficacy of low-dose acetazolamide (125 mg BID) for the prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness: a prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial.
TLDR
It is concluded that acetazolamide 125 mg twice daily was effective in decreasing the incidence of AMS in this Himalayan trekking population.
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