Detection of parasite eggs from archaeological excavations in the Republic of Korea.

@article{Han2003DetectionOP,
  title={Detection of parasite eggs from archaeological excavations in the Republic of Korea.},
  author={Eun-Taek Han and Sang Mee Guk and Jae-Lip Kim and Hoon-Jin Jeong and Soo-Nam Kim and Jong Yil Chai},
  journal={Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz},
  year={2003},
  volume={98 Suppl 1},
  pages={
          123-6
        }
}
  • E. Han, S. Guk, +3 authors J. Chai
  • Published 2003
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Memorias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
Excavations at two sites dating from 2000 BC-1900 AD in southeastern areas of the Republic of Korea, revealed the remains of several structures. Examination of the contents suspected privies revealed the presence of eggs from 5 kinds of parasite: Ascaris, Trichuris, Clonorchis, and two species of unknown trematodes. Clonorchis sinensis eggs were found in a soil dating from around AD 668-935. This is the first record of C. sinensis eggs in archaeological materials in the Republic of Korea. 
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