Detection of enteric viruses in treated drinking water.

Abstract

The occurrence of viruses in conventionally treated drinking water derived from a heavily polluted source was evaluated by collecting and analyzing 38 large-volume (65- to 756-liter) samples of water from a 9 m3/s (205 X 10(6) gallons [776 X 10(6) liters] per day) water treatment plant. Samples of raw, clarified, filtered, and chlorinated finished water were concentrated by using the filter adsorption-elution technique. Of 23 samples of finished water, 19 (83%) contained viruses. None of the nine finished water samples collected during the dry season contained detectable total coliform bacteria. Seven of nine finished water samples collected during the dry season met turbidity, total coliform bacteria, and total residual chlorine standards. Of these, four contained virus. During the dry season the percent removals were 25 to 93% for enteric viruses, 89 to 100% for bacteria, and 81% for turbidity. During the rainy season the percent removals were 0 to 43% for enteric viruses, 80 to 96% for bacteria, and 63% for turbidity. None of the 14 finished water samples collected during the rainy season met turbidity standards, and all contained rotaviruses or enteroviruses.

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@article{Keswick1984DetectionOE, title={Detection of enteric viruses in treated drinking water.}, author={B H Keswick and C P Gerba and H L DuPont and J B Rose}, journal={Applied and environmental microbiology}, year={1984}, volume={47 6}, pages={1290-4} }