Detection of Perchlorate and the Soluble Chemistry of Martian Soil at the Phoenix Lander Site

@article{Hecht2009DetectionOP,
  title={Detection of Perchlorate and the Soluble Chemistry of Martian Soil at the Phoenix Lander Site},
  author={Michael H. Hecht and Samuel P. Kounaves and Richard C. Quinn and Steven. West and Suzanne M. M. Young and Doug W. Ming and David C. Catling and Benton C. Clark and William V. Boynton and John H. Hoffman and Lauren P. Deflores and Kalina Gospodinova and Jason Kapit and P. H. Smith},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={325},
  pages={64 - 67}
}
Phoenix Ascending The Phoenix mission landed on Mars in March 2008 with the goal of studying the ice-rich soil of the planet's northern arctic region. Phoenix included a robotic arm, with a camera attached to it, with the capacity to excavate through the soil to the ice layer beneath it, scoop up soil and water ice samples, and deliver them to a combination of other instruments—including a wet chemistry lab and a high-temperature oven combined with a mass spectrometer—for chemical and… 

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Perchlorates on Mars: Implications for the Detection of Organics on Mars

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The analysis of the data from the Phoenix mission revealed an alkaline environment, in contrast to that found by the Mars Exploration Rovers, indicating that many different environments have existed on Mars.

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