Detection, isolation and characterization of a root-exuded compound, methyl 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionate, responsible for biological nitrification inhibition by sorghum (Sorghum bicolor).

@article{Zakir2008DetectionIA,
  title={Detection, isolation and characterization of a root-exuded compound, methyl 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionate, responsible for biological nitrification inhibition by sorghum (Sorghum bicolor).},
  author={H. Zakir and G. Subbarao and S. J. Pearse and S. Gopalakrishnan and O. Ito and Takayuki Ishikawa and N. Kawano and K. Nakahara and T. Yoshihashi and H. Ono and Mitsuru Yoshida},
  journal={The New phytologist},
  year={2008},
  volume={180 2},
  pages={
          442-51
        }
}
Nitrification results in poor nitrogen (N) recovery and negative environmental impacts in most agricultural systems. Some plant species release secondary metabolites from their roots that inhibit nitrification, a phenomenon known as biological nitrification inhibition (BNI). Here, we attempt to characterize BNI in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor). In solution culture, the effect of N nutrition and plant age was studied on BNI activity from roots. A bioluminescence assay using recombinant Nitrosomonas… Expand
Biological nitrification inhibition in maize—isolation and identification of hydrophobic inhibitors from root exudates
To control agronomic N losses and reduce environmental pollution, biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) is a promising strategy. BNI is an ecological phenomenon by which certain plants releaseExpand
Effect of methyl 3-4-hydroxyphenyl propionate, a Sorghum root exudate, on N dynamic, potential nitrification activity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea
TLDR
Findings suggest that methyl 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionate is capable of suppressing nitrification in soil, possibly by reducing the population size and activity of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. Expand
Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) activity in sorghum and its characterization
AimsThe ability to suppress soil nitrification through the release of nitrification inhibitors from plant roots is termed ‘biological nitrification inhibition’ (BNI). Here, we aimed at theExpand
Factors influencing the release of the biological nitrification inhibitor 1,9-decanediol from rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots
AimsRoot exudates of rice (Oryza sativa L.) can inhibit nitrification in Nitrosomonas bioassays, and 1,9-decanediol was recently identified as an important new biological nitrification inhibitorExpand
Biological nitrification inhibition by rice root exudates and its relationship with nitrogen-use efficiency.
TLDR
Correlation analyses indicated that both BNI abilities and 1,9-decanediol amounts of root exudates were positively correlated with plant ammonium-use efficiency and ammonium preference, providing important new insights into the plant-bacterial interactions involved in the soil N cycle, and improve the understanding of the BNI capacity of rice in the context of NUE. Expand
Sorgoleone release from sorghum roots shapes the composition of nitrifying populations, total bacteria, and archaea and determines the level of nitrification
TLDR
Multivariate analysis and Spearman’s correlations revealed that sorgoleone as well as environmental factors such as soil pH, soil moisture, NO 3 − -N, and NH 4 + -N shape the composition of microbial communities. Expand
Further insights into underlying mechanisms for the release of biological nitrification inhibitors from sorghum roots
TLDR
The results indicate that some unknown membrane transporters are operating the release of protonated BNIs, which may compensate for charge balance when transport of other anions is suppressed using anion-channel blockers. Expand
Biological nitrification inhibition in sorghum: the role of sorgoleone production
Background and aimsNitrification and denitrification are the two most important processes that contribute to greenhouse gas emission and inefficient use of nitrogen. Suppressing soil nitrificationExpand
Biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) - is there potential for genetic interventions in the Triticeae?
TLDR
This review outlines the current status of knowledge regarding the potential for genetic improvement in the BNI capacity of the Triticeae and suggests approaches are critical to the development of the next-generation of crops and production systems where nitrification is biologically suppressed/regulated to reduce nitrogen leakage and protect the environment from nitrogen pollution. Expand
Potential role of fungal endophytes in biological nitrification inhibition in Brachiaria grass species
TLDR
It is shown that cultivating soils with Brachiaria grasses could offer more agronomic and environmental benefits due to low N loss through nitrification than leaving the soils bare, and Tully and Basilisk were essentially the most outstanding candidates for low-nitrifying forage systems, as shown by their high BNI activity and/or low rates of nitrification. Expand
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TLDR
It is suggested that the BNI capacity could either be managed and/or introduced into pastures/crops with an expression of this phenomenon, via genetic improvement approaches that combine high productivity along with some capacity to regulate soil nitrification process. Expand
A bioluminescence assay to detect nitrification inhibitors released from plant roots: a case study with Brachiaria humidicola
TLDR
The proposed bioluminescence assay can be used to characterize and determine the BNI activity of plant roots, thus it could become a powerful tool in genetically exploiting the B NI trait in crops and pastures. Expand
NH4+ triggers the synthesis and release of biological nitrification inhibition compounds in Brachiaria humidicola roots
TLDR
Results indicate that the release of BNI-compounds from B. humidicola roots is a regulated function and that presence of NH4+ in the root environment is necessary for the sustained synthesis and release ofBNI. Expand
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Evidence is produced that a tropical grass species, Brachiaria humidicola, produces chemicals that inhibit nitrification in soil, described as biological nitrification inhibitors (BNIs), which highlights how molecular biology can be used to introduce traits into micro-organisms responsible for key soil N transformations in a way that facilitates analysis of the interaction between plants and the soil environment so crucial to their growth and survival. Expand
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TLDR
The results indicate that these hydrophobic exudate droplets contain components that may have species-specific biological activities, Additionalindex words: 3-Deoxyanthocyanidins, Root hairs, Root exudates, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moenchl seedlings grown in petri dishes. Expand
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TLDR
It is observed that the mechanism of nitrogen deficiency tolerance due to enhanced PAL activity is temporally limited, and this is an important biochemical factor contributing to the observed increase of phenolic compounds accumulation by producing nitrogen-free skeletons of t -cinnamate for subsequent pathways of phenylpropanoid metabolism. Expand
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TLDR
Two active inhibitory compounds were isolated by activity-guided fractionation, using recombinant Nitrosomonas europaea containing luxAB genes derived from the bioluminescent marine gram-negative bacterium Vibrio harveyi, identified as methyl-p-coumarate and methyl ferulate. Expand
Sugar exudation by roots of kallar grass [Leptochloa fusca (L.) Kunth] is strongly affected by the nitrogen source
TLDR
It is suggested that the much higher sugar exudation in response to ammonium may facilitate the ecologically and economically important association of diazotrophs with kallar grass roots. Expand
Can biological nitrification inhibition (BNI) genes from perennial Leymus racemosus (Triticeae) combat nitrification in wheat farming?
TLDR
The first finding of high production of BNI in a wild relative of any cereal is reported and its successful introduction and expression in cultivated wheat demonstrates the potential for empowering the new generation of wheat cultivars with high-BNI capacity to control nitrification in wheat-production systems. Expand
3,4-Dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) – a new nitrification inhibitor for agriculture and horticulture
Abstract. 3,4-Dimethylpyrazole phosphate (DMPP) is a new nitrification inhibitor with highly favourable properties. It has undergone thorough toxicology and ecotoxicology tests andExpand
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