Detecting the Snake in the Grass

@article{Lobue2008DetectingTS,
  title={Detecting the Snake in the Grass},
  author={Vanessa Lobue and Judy S Deloache},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2008},
  volume={19},
  pages={284 - 289}
}
Snakes are among the most common targets of fears and phobias. In visual detection tasks, adults detect their presence more rapidly than the presence of other kinds of visual stimuli. We report evidence that very young children share this attentional bias. In three experiments, preschool children and adults were asked to find a single target picture among an array of eight distractors. Both the children and the adults detected snakes more rapidly than three types of nonthreatening stimuli… Expand
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