Detecting correlated evolution on phylogenies: a general method for the comparative analysis of discrete characters

@article{Pagel1994DetectingCE,
  title={Detecting correlated evolution on phylogenies: a general method for the comparative analysis of discrete characters},
  author={Mark Pagel},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1994},
  volume={255},
  pages={37 - 45}
}
  • M. Pagel
  • Published 22 January 1994
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
I present a new statistical method for analysing the relationship between two discrete characters that are measured across a group of hierarchically evolved species or populations. The method assesses whether a pattern of association across the group is evidence for correlated evolutionary change in the two characters. The method takes into account information on the lengths of the branches of phylogenetic trees, develops estimates of the rates of change of the discrete characters, and tests… 

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