Detecting a Theta or a Prism

@article{Chudnovsky2008DetectingAT,
  title={Detecting a Theta or a Prism},
  author={M. Chudnovsky and Rohan Kapadia},
  journal={SIAM J. Discret. Math.},
  year={2008},
  volume={22},
  pages={1164-1186}
}
A theta in a graph is an induced subgraph consisting of two nonadjacent vertices joined by three disjoint paths. A prism in a graph is an induced subgraph consisting of two disjoint triangles joined by three disjoint paths. This paper gives a polynomial-time algorithm to test whether a graph has an induced subgraph that is either a prism or a theta. 
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