Detecting Invasions of Marine Organisms: Kamptozoan Case Histories

@article{Wasson2004DetectingIO,
  title={Detecting Invasions of Marine Organisms: Kamptozoan Case Histories},
  author={Kerstin Wasson and Betsy von Holle and Jason D Toft and Gregory M. Ruiz},
  journal={Biological Invasions},
  year={2004},
  volume={2},
  pages={59-74}
}
Detecting marine invasions can be challenging, especially for lesser-known taxa, and requires (a) thorough field surveys of the region of interest for members of the taxon, (b) systematic analyses to identify all species found, (c) literature searches for the worldwide distribution of these species and for previous records of the taxon in this region, and (d) application of rigorous criteria to assess whether each species found is native or introduced. We carried out these steps in order to… 
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