Destruction of neurons by cytotoxic T cells: A new pathogenic mechanism in rasmussen's encephalitis

@article{Bien2002DestructionON,
  title={Destruction of neurons by cytotoxic T cells: A new pathogenic mechanism in rasmussen's encephalitis},
  author={C. Bien and J. Bauer and T. Deckwerth and H. Wiendl and M. Deckert and O. Wiestler and J. Schramm and C. Elger and H. Lassmann},
  journal={Annals of Neurology},
  year={2002},
  volume={51}
}
Rasmussen's encephalitis is a progressive epileptic disorder characterized by unihemispheric lymphocytic infiltrates, microglial nodules, and neuronal loss leading to the destruction of the affected hemisphere. In this study, immunohistochemical evaluation of specimens from 11 patients revealed lymphocytic infiltrates that consisted mainly of CD3+CD8+ T cells. Of these cells, 7.0% lay in direct apposition to MHC class I+ neurons. Confocal laser microscopy revealed that these lymphocytes… Expand
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